Looking Back

We tend to take pictures of the water at our amazing waterfront. However, the other day after putting away the boats on the dock, I was “drawn” to the view looking back.

Looking back from the end of the pier. One can either go off to the right back to the paddle shed and the waterfront field - or they can venture straight up the stairs to shaded, quiet places. Sometimes, the gulls perch along the rail daring you to disturb their resting time.

Looking back from the end of the pier. One can either go off to the right back to the paddle shed and the waterfront field - or they can venture straight up the stairs to shaded, quiet places. Sometimes, the gulls perch along the rail daring you to disturb their resting time.

When you choose to go straight, you encounter these stairs. Every now and then, we try to control the moss and foliage growing on the steps - not too much however, they are pretty in a rugged, semi-neglected way.

When you choose to go straight, you encounter these stairs. Every now and then, we try to control the moss and foliage growing on the steps - not too much however, they are pretty in a rugged, semi-neglected way.

I love this cedar tree. You encounter it after climbing the stairs. Of all the trees at Sound View, I believe this one deserves an Entish name. It is a good tree to sit under to enjoy the breezes which waft up from the Sound.

I love this cedar tree. You encounter it after climbing the stairs. Of all the trees at Sound View, I believe this one deserves an Entish name. It is a good tree to sit under to enjoy the breezes which waft up from the Sound.

And the road (trail) goes ever on and on. This one continues up to the ropes course taking a dark, scenic, wooded way. One can imagine natives using this path to portage their canoes to the other side of the Peninsula to avoid the stormy Devil’s Head.

And the road (trail) goes ever on and on. This one continues up to the ropes course taking a dark, scenic, wooded way. One can imagine natives using this path to portage their canoes to the other side of the Peninsula to avoid the stormy Devil’s Head.